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Flight Delay Compensation

Did you know about Flight delay compensation?

Let’s admit it, at some time, you’ve probably missed a flight due to cancellation or you’ve had to wait at the airport for many hours due to delays. In addition to the major disruption this can cause to holiday and work schedules, it is also a stressful experience, particularly if you have children with you or tight deadlines to meet such as connecting flights or events.

Did you know that if you had a delayed or cancelled flight in the past 3 years, you could receive €600 per passenger, regardless of the ticket price? Additionally, you could be entitled to claim for luggage problems such as missing bags, delayed bags or damaged bags and also for out of pocket expenses such as hotels, meals & more.

Air passengers have rights. In the EU they are covered by EU REGULATION EC 261.

Even if your particular issue is not covered by law, it is often worthwhile claiming, you may still be entitled to a refund or vouchers for another flight.

Compensation is available for flight delays, flight cancellation, missed connections, overbooking, denied boarding, delayed baggage, and airline strikes.

The Poland Travel Agency works with AirHelp, the world’s largest air passenger rights advocate. To date, they’ve helped over 16 million passengers understand their rights and secure compensation for delayed, cancelled, or overbooked flights.

They make claiming flight delay compensation straightforward for all passengers who are unsure of their rights, lack the time, or lack the expertise to embark on the claims process themselves. They’re continually investing in data and cutting-edge technology to power their easy-to-use website and make their customers’ claims even smoother.

They speak 16 languages, and their global staff of 750 includes the world’s largest team of lawyers specialised in air passenger rights. Combined with local knowledge from a network of law firms across 30 countries, they are uniquely placed to help air passengers all around the world.

Check now to see if you are entitled to compensation – Visit AirHelp

Latest Coronavirus News

Welcome to our Latest Coronavirus News section where we keep you updated on the latest COVID-19 restrictions.

RESTRICTIONS CONCERNING MOVEMENT

1.5 M – MINIMUM DISTANCE BETWEEN PEDESTRIANS

It is mandatory that a distance of least 1.5 meters be maintained between pedestrians.

The following persons are exempt from the restriction:

  • parents with children who require care (younger than 13),
  • persons who live in one household or run a household together,
  • disabled persons, persons incapable of moving on their own, persons with a special educational needs statement and their carers.

COVERING YOUR MOUTH AND NOSE ONLY WITH A MASK IN PUBLIC SPACES

It is mandatory to cover your mouth and nose in such places as:

  • in buses, trams and trains,
  • in shops, malls, banks, markets and post offices
  • in cinemas and theatres,
  • at physician’s offices, in outpatient clinics and hospitals, in massage and tattoo parlours
  • in churches, at schools and universities,
  • In government offices (when going there to take care of certain matters) and other civic centres.

Where is it not mandatory to cover your mouth and nose? In forests, parks, green squares, botanical gardens, historic gardens, family community gardens and on beaches as well as while travelling by private car.

Important!  Exemption from the obligation to cover the mouth and nose is limited only to persons who have a medical certificate or a document confirming:

  • a pervasive developmental disorder,
  • a mental disorder,
  • moderate, severe or profound intellectual disability,
  • difficulties in uncovering the mouth or nose on their own.

Covering the mouth and nose in public spaces is obligatory throughout the entire country.

QUARANTINE

NATIONWIDE RULES:

The restriction applies to persons who:

  • are crossing the border of the Republic of Poland which constitutes the external border of the EU*,
  • are crossing the Polish border from the Schengen zone,
  • had contact with persons infected with the coronavirus, or are living with an infected (isolated) person,
  • have been referred for a COVID-19 test by a primary or night care physician.

* The external border is defined by the provisions of Article 2(2) of Regulation (EU) 2016/399 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 9 March on a Union Code on the rules governing the movement of persons across borders (Schengen Borders Code) (OJ EU L 77 of 23 March 2016, p. 1, as amended).

Rules for passengers arriving to Poland from the Schengen zone

  • Passengers are subject to quarantine unless they present a negative COVID-19 test result. The test will have to be taken no later than 48 hours before crossing the border.
  • Type of test: PCR or antigen test.
  • The measure will cover all modes of transport: public and private transport as well as crossing the border on foot.
  • Passengers who were directed to quarantine in Poland will be able to take a test, a negative result of which will exempt them from quarantine.

Rules for passengers arriving to Poland from outside the Schengen Zone

  • Each passenger is directed to quarantine.
  • Passengers will not be exempt from quarantine on the basis of a test performed in the country from which the person arrives.
  • Passengers who were directed to quarantine may take a test in Poland, a negative result of which will exempt them from quarantine.
  • Type of test: PCR or antigen test.

Important! Persons vaccinated against COVID-19 are exempt from quarantine. This applies to persons who have been issued a certificate of preventive vaccination with a vaccine that has been approved for marketing in the European Union.

Persons travelling from India, the Republic of South Africa and Brazil, cannot be exempted from quarantine on the basis of a test carried out within 48 hours after arriving to Poland. This will only be possible after 7 days. The obligation to undergo quarantine is deemed to have been fulfilled when a negative test result is entered by a medical diagnostic laboratory to the IT system.

What does it involve?

Rules concerning:

  • quarantine (confinement of a healthy individual due to exposure to infection);
  • isolation (confinement of a person with a positive result of the first diagnostic test for SARS-CoV-2).

Home isolation lasts for 10 days, provided that the patient does not exhibit symptoms of COVID-19.

Should coronavirus symptoms appear during isolation, a primary healthcare physician orders prolongation of the period of isolation, which cannot end earlier than 13 days after the symptoms have appeared.

In case of isolation in hospitals and isolation wards, the end of the period of isolation is decided by the physician responsible for the patient, but cannot come earlier than 13 days after the symptoms have appeared, wherein the last three days must by symptom-free.

Quarantine lasts for 10 days if no symptoms of COVID-19 have occurred. Testing of asymptomatic individuals in quarantine has been abandoned.

During this time:

  • you may not leave your home,
  • you may not walk your dog, go shopping or go visit a physician,
  • if a person in quarantine is in close contact with other persons at home, they must also be quarantined,
  • should you experience symptoms of the disease (feeling unwell, fever, coughing, shortness of breath), you must report this by phone to the sanitary and epidemiological station.

Important! As part of their regular patrols, police officers visit quarantined persons and make sure that they are staying at their place of residence. Regulations provide for a fine of up to PLN 30 thousand for breaking the quarantine. The decision concerning the actual amount of the fine is always made on a case-by-case basis.

Attention! The quarantine is suspended for the duration of the test you have been referred for by a primary or night care physician (the way to the swab collection site and return home). From 28 November quarantine or isolation is suspended, when you need to see a doctor. Under the above circumstances, reporting to a sanitary and epidemiological station is not required.

Valid until 5 June

SOCIAL LIFE

CULTURAL EVENTS – RESTRICTIONS

Museums and art galleries

From 4 May, museums and art galleries will be reopened and allowed to operate under a strict sanitary regime, with a limit of 1 person per 15 m2.

Valid until 5 June

Cinemas, theatres, operas, philharmonics

From 15 May, open-air cinemas and theatres will be reopened and allowed to operate under a strict sanitary regime at 50% capacity.

From 28 May, cinemas and theatres will be reopened and allowed to operate under a strict sanitary regime at 50% capacity.

Valid until 5 June

Cultural centres

From 15 May to 28 May cultural centres and community after-school clubs may carry out their activities outdoors provided that no more than 15 persons take part in such activities, the distance of 1.5 m between the participants is maintained and the participants do not drink or eat.

From 28 May 2021 cultural centres and community after-school clubs may carry out their activities both outdoors and indoors provided that no more than 15 persons take part in such activities, the distance of 1.5 m between the participants is maintained, and the participants comply with the obligation to cover their mouths and noses and with the obligation not to drink or eat.

Valid until 5 June

Libraries

  • collections may be made available to the public, provided that the limit of 1 person per 15 m², excluding librarians, is observed. Information about the limit of persons that may enter the library must be placed at its entrance.

Valid until 5 June

PUBLIC TRANSPORT

Public transport vehicles may be boarded by a limited number of persons.

In the entire country, the number of persons who can board a public transport vehicle at the same time may not exceed:

  • 100% of the seating capacity, or
  • 50% of the combined seating and standing capacity, leaving at least 50% of seats in the vehicle unoccupied.

These limits do not apply to vehicles for the transport of disabled passengers.

Valid until 5 June

RELIGIOUS CEREMONIES

From 4 May, the limit of people in places of religious worship will change to a max. of 1 person per 15 m2. We also recommend holding ceremonies in the open air.

Important! In churches and places of worship it is mandatory to cover your mouth and nose. Persons celebrating the event are exempt from this obligation.

Valid until 5 June

GATHERINGS AND MEETINGS

GATHERINGS

Public gatherings may be attended by no more than 25 persons. Participants are obliged to maintain a distance of 1.5 meters from each other. In addition, gatherings may not be organised less than 100 m apart.

MEETINGS

From 8 May, a maximum of 25 people may participate in parties and meetings organised at homes; this limit does not include the person organising the party or the meeting or people who live with this person or who are members of the same household as this person.

From 28 May, a maximum of 50 people may participate in parties or meetings organised outdoors, in restaurants or in designated catering areas.

The limit of persons does not include those who have been vaccinated against COVID-19.

Valid until 5 June

WEDDINGS, COMMUNIONS, FUNERAL RECEPTIONS AND OTHER CELEBRATIONS

From 8 May, it will be possible to organise special events outdoors, with a limit of max. 25 people. Such events will be allowed to take place under a strict sanitary regime, including keeping a safe distance between the tables and abiding by the limit on the number of people per table (applicable regulations are the same as in the case of open-air gastronomy).

From 28 May, it will be possible to organise special events indoors (e.g. in a restaurant), with a limit of max. 50 people. Such events will be allowed to take place under a strict sanitary regime, including keeping a safe distance between the tables and abiding by the limit on the number of people per table (applicable regulations are the same as in the case of open-air gastronomy).

Valid until 5 June

NIGHT CLUBS, DISCOS AND OTHER PLACES FOR DANCING

The activity of such venues is prohibited in the entire country, except for: sports dance clubs.

Valid until 5 June

FAIRS, EXHIBITIONS, CONGRESSES AND CONFERENCES

Fairs, exhibitions, congresses and conferences may be held only online.

Valid until 5 June

EDUCATION

From 17 May, primary schools students of grades 1-3 will continue their stationary learning. Primary and secondary schools students of the remaining grades will switch to blended learning.

Valid until 28 May 2021

From 31 May, all students will return to stationary learning.

Valid until further notice

NURSERIES AND KINDERGARTENS

From 19 April 2021, nurseries and kindergartens in the entire country will be open, providing care for all children.

Valid until further notice

BORDERS AND INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC

BORDERS OF POLAND

Rules for passengers arriving to Poland from the Schengen zone

  • Passengers are subject to quarantine unless they present a negative COVID-19 test result. The test will have to be taken no later than 48 hours before crossing the border.
  • Type of test: PCR or antigen test.
  • The measure will cover all modes of transport: public and private transport as well as crossing the border on foot.
  • Passengers who were directed to quarantine in Poland will be able to take a test, a negative result of which will exempt them from quarantine.

Rules for passengers arriving to Poland from outside the Schengen Zone

  • Each passenger is directed to quarantine.
  • Passengers will not be exempt from quarantine on the basis of a test performed in the country from which the person arrives.
  • Passengers who were directed to quarantine may take a test in Poland, a negative result of which will exempt them from quarantine.
  • Type of test: PCR or antigen test.

Important! Persons vaccinated against COVID-19 are exempt from quarantine. This applies to persons who have been issued a certificate of preventive vaccination with a vaccine that has been approved for marketing in the European Union.

INTERNATIONAL RAILWAY TRAFFIC

International passenger transport by rail that crosses the Polish border is suspended.

Valid until 5 June

ECONOMY

SHOPPING CENTRES AND LARGE-FORMAT STORES

From 4 May, shopping malls, DIY and furniture shops will be reopened. They will be allowed to operate under a strict sanitary regime, with a limit of 1 person per 15 m2.

Valid until 5 June

GASTRONOMY

From 15 May, outdoor areas of restaurants will be reopened. They will be allowed to operate under a strict sanitary regime, including keeping a safe distance between the tables and abiding by the limit on the number of people per table

From 28 May, restaurants will be reopened. They will be allowed to operate under a strict sanitary regime at a max. 50% capacity, including keeping a safe distance between the tables and abiding by the limit on the number of people per table.

Valid until 5 June

School canteens

This ban also applies to running school canteens. Meals may be served only for grades 1-3 of primary school and the teaching staff under a sanitary regime.

Note! Only every second table may be occupied. The distance between the tables must be at least 1.5 m, unless there is a partition of at least 1 m in height between the tables, counting from the table surface.

Hotel restaurants

From 8 May, hotels will be reopened, except for the restaurant and wellness & spa areas.

From 15 May, outdoor areas of restaurants will be reopened. They will be allowed to operate under a strict sanitary regime, including keeping a safe distance between the tables and abiding by the limit on the number of people per table

From 28 May, restaurants will be able to resume operations. They will be allowed to operate under a strict sanitary regime at max. 50% capacity, including keeping a safe distance between the tables and abiding by the limit on the number of people per table.

Valid until 5 June

HAIR AND BEAUTY SALONS, TATTOO PARLORS

From 1 May, hair and beauty salons across the country will be reopened. They will be allowed to operate under a strict sanitary regime.

Valid until 5 June

HOTELS

From 8 May, hotels will be reopened, except for the restaurant and wellness & spa areas, with a limit of 50% capacity.

Valid until 5 June

SPORT AND LEISURE

GYMS, FITNESS CLUBS AND CENTRES, SWIMMING POOLS AND AQUAPARKS

The following businesses are closed:

  • swimming pools, gyms and fitness clubs (excluding those for patients or members of the Polish national team)
  • saunas, solariums, Turkish baths, weight loss salons, casinos
  • ski slopes;
  • sports facilities (they may only be used for professional sports purposes and without spectators).

From 16 April 2021, children and youth will be allowed to participate in sports competitions held by relevant Polish sports associations.

It will also be permitted to practice sports in outdoor sports facilities, maintaining a limit of 25 participants (both children, youth and adults).

The operation of other sports facilities (sports halls, indoor pitches etc.) is still limited to professional sports only.

All events may be held without audiences. Gyms, fitness clubs, swimming pools, saunas, solariums etc. will remain closed. Exemptions from the rules are established in the regulation.

From 1 May, it will be possible to practice sports in outdoor sports facilities, subject to a limit of up to 50 persons (including children, adolescents and adults).

From 1 May, it will also be possible to practice sports in indoor sports facilities and swimming pools, subject to a limit of max. 50% capacity.

From 15 May, sports events in outdoor facilities will be allowed to take place at max. 25% of audience capacity.

From 28 May, gyms, fitness clubs and tanning salons will be reopened with a limit of 1 person per 15 m2. Swimming pools, water parks and indoor sports facilities will also be reopened with a limit of max. 50% of the capacity of a given facility and subject to the requirement to make available no more than 50% of all seats intended for the audience, every second seat in rows alternately, or the requirement to maintain a distance of 1.5 m between spectators if there are no designated seats.

The limit of persons does not include those who have been vaccinated against COVID-19.

Valid until 5 June

EXEMPTION OF PARTICIPANTS OF INTERNATIONAL SPORTS COMPETITIONS FROM OBLIGATORY QUARANTINE

The exemption of people from outside of the EU from obligatory quarantine concerns:

  • competitors,
  • coaching staff members,
  • doctors, physiotherapists,
  • umpires,
  • accredited journalists.

The exemption applies to persons who are participating in competitions organised by:

  • an international sports federation of an Olympic or Paralympic sport, or another organisation recognised by the International Olympics Committee,
  • an international continental sports organisation belonging to a sports federation,
  • Polish sports association.

Note! Persons crossing the Polish border must present the Border Guard with a letter issued by the organiser of the sports competition. It may also be a document – certified by a Polish sports association competent in a given sport – containing data concerning the fact of organisation of the sports competitions, its date as well as the nature of that person’s participation.

OLYMPIC PREPARATION CENTRES FOR SPORTSPEOPLE

Competitors are allowed to be preparing for the most important international events at COS-OPO (Central Sports Centre – Olympic Preparation Centres). All Olympic Preparation Centres are currently open (Spała, Wałcz, Zakopane, Cetniewo, Szczyrk and Giżycko).

Valid until 5 June

SANATORIUMS, HEALTH RESORTS AND REHABILITATION

As of 11 March 2021, health resorts resume their operations. As of 15 March 2021, the condition to begin inpatient rehabilitation in a rehabilitation centre or a therapeutic-preventive stay will be a negative result of a diagnostic test for SARS-CoV-2. The material must be collected no earlier than 4 days before the start of the rehabilitation stay. You will not have to pay for the tests.

Valid until further notice

Sanctuary of the Holy Cross Wood Relic

The Sanctuary of the Holy Cross Wood Relic and Museum of the Missionary Oblates of the Virgin Mary are located on Łysiec mountain, nowadays referred to as Święty Krzyż mountain.

Święty Krzyż (Mount Holy Cross) is the second highest mountain in the region at 595m. If you believe local folk legend, the mountain was especially liked by witches and during their Sabbaths, they practised witchcraft and organised hellish parties and dances on the summit.

Today, you can see remains of a 9th century stone rampart surrounding the top of the mountain in addition to the Benedictine monastery with its Relics of the Holy Cross Tree. The 1000 year old monastery is managed by the Missionary Oblates.

Every year, the Holy Cross Sanctuary is visited by crowds of pilgrims, visitors and tourists, who want to see this unique place. In the church on the mountain you can see a valuable painting of Franciszek Smuglewicz, monastery porches, a sacristy, the Oleśnicki family’s chapel and the Museum of the Missionary Oblates of the Virgin Mary.

The Świętokrzyskie Mountains are not particularly high; however they are ancient. Quartzite has been discovered in the area that is 500 million years old. The highest peak is Mount Łysica at 614 m and is located within the Świętokrzyski National Park.

Holy Cross Province (Swietokrzyskie) is located in south eastern Poland and has the city of Kielce as its regional capital. Often referred to as, “The heart of Poland.”

With a history dating back over 900 years, Kielce was once an important mining centre, today, the city and its surroundings are better known for their historic architecture, green spaces and recreational areas like the Świętokrzyski National Park and the Kadzielnia Reserve. Kielce is the only city in Europe which counts five nature reserves within its borders.

There’s a lot of attractions to see in Kielce. The former Palace of the Kraków Bishops, the picturesque National Museum, Kielce Cathedral, and Dworek Laszczyków are must-sees.

Kadzielnia Reserve Kielce

Kadzielnia is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Kielce. The former quarry attracts visitors interested in music, extreme experiences such as ziplining and also geology enthusiasts.

It is located on a hill as part of the Kadzielnia Range and is 295m above sea level. As a quarry back in the 18th century, it was a significant source of limestone, which was required primarily for road construction and you can still find traces of mining activity around the area.

In the centre is the Geologists Rock and this is protected as part of the Kadzielnia Nature Reserve and is not open to tourists, instead visitors admire the rock from the surrounding paths and viewpoints surrounding the quarry.

You’ll find a number of attractions in Kadzielnia such as the underground tourist route, the amphitheatre, a zip-line station and a waterfall.

Kadzielnia is very popular with palaeontologists and geologists who come to the area in search of fossils. Many different fossils have been found including sponges, corals, daylilies, brachiopods and snails.

Kadzielnia is also home to 25 caves. There are three caves open to the public and this is where you can find the 140m long underground tourist route.

The Kadzielnia Amphitheater is one of the most unique and beautiful stages in the country. The surrounding rocks provide a natural backdrop and also enhance the acoustics. The amphitheatre has operated for more than 50 years and underwent a thorough modernisation in 2010, today it can seat as many as 5,430 spectators. During inclement weather, the stage and auditorium is covered with a retractable roof.

Kadzielnia Amphitheater

The amphitheater hosts large, modern artistic shows and concerts, among them the cult “pinwheel”, the International Scout Festival of School Youth Culture and the annual Kielce Festival.

There’s much more to Kadzielnia than a concert among the rocks, exploring the caves and the amazing views. Thrill-seekers come to the area to admire the scenery from a height of 40m during a free rope descent. The Kadzielnia Rope Park includes three descents.

Every year, the Kadzielnia Sport Festival is hosted in the area and attracts extreme sports enthusiasts from near and afar.

Groups, Pages & Links

There are lots of good resources out there providing quality information to expats. Below, we have listed our favourites.

Brits in Poland – is a very useful resource and they have both a website and a Facebook page. They provide information about all sorts of things but are very focussed on the challenges facing expats post-Brexit.

Brits in Poland (a different version) – This is a Facebook group for Brits living in Poland. You’ll find some interesting posts here dealing with topical and everyday things.

InterNations – there’s a lot of information available here. They also organise various events.

The First News – an excellent website and Facebook page, which aims to bring readers entertaining, engaging and informative news, features and reportage from across Poland and beyond.

Kids in the City – Family life in Poland – kidsinthecity.pl is a platform for families looking for inspirations on how to spend family time in Warsaw and Poland. They also have a Facebook page.

Food from home Warsaw

Whether it's Marmite, pork sausages, steak & kidney pie, fish and chips or something else, most expats will have a craving for, 'food from home' at some point during their stay here in Warsaw.

Don't worry! It is possible to find most things, it was easier prior to Brexit for sure, but if you look in the right places, you will sometimes find what you're looking for. On this page, we help you to track down those goodies from home that you can't live without.

The easiest way to get your fix is to find a bar or restaurant that will make it for you. There’s not a great deal of choice in Warsaw, but Legends Bar on Emilii Plater 25 will help you. They have a tradition British menu and serve all-day English breakfast, steak and kidney pie complete with mushy peas and onion gravy, fish and chips and various other pub favourites.

If you prefer to hunt for your fix and make it at home, then there’s a few options.

The British Shop in Warsaw, at Emilii Plater 12 has everything that you need; however it really is not cheap. But what’s the price of a fix, right? The good news is, you don’t have to go to the shop, they have an online store.

Many expats do their shopping at Dealz, there’s a few of them scattered around the city and they often have a good selection of British food, although the selection has dwindled somewhat since Brexit. You might be lucky though and go on a good day. You can see where their shops are and check out what they sell on their website.

There’s plenty of Lidl stores in the city, and they often stock British food. If you’re really lucky, on a good day, they have proper bacon.

Kuchnie Świata in Złote Tarasy is a good place to find chocolates such as traditional British Easter eggs, but is on the expensive side.

General Information for Expats

The purpose of this section of Poland Expat Information is to cover topics of a general nature, the subjects which tend to be asked by new expats arriving in the country. We will add and update this page on a regular basis.

Money Transfers:

One of the questions, which pops up time and time again, is what is the best way to transfer money to Poland? We’ve asked around within the Expat community and these are the recommendations:

The most popular method by far was Wise (formerly TransferWise).

Transfer money or spend abroad 6x cheaper than old-school banks, and receive money around the world for free. Always with the real exchange rate, no hidden fees.

Residency, Passports, Driving Licence, Healthcare & Working:

We have provided information on these subjects here.

Dental Services in Poland:

Please visit our sister website, ‘Dentists in Poland’ for information about dental services and finding a dentist.

Meeting people

When you first come to Poland, unless you live in a city where it’s easy to find other expats or new friends, it can be quite lonely. A good way to find friends or like-minded people is to search online. Our Love Poland platform has been specifically designed so that you can search for friends who have the same interests and live in the same area as yourself. It’s free to join.

Cooking experiences

If you’re in Warsaw and want to learn how to cook pierogi properly and enjoy a few Polish liqueurs at the same time? Check out these local cooking experiences.

Living in Poland

Living in Poland

Within this section of Poland Expat Information, we specifically look at UK nationals living in or moving to Poland and look at residency, passports & travel, driving, healthcare & working.

Residency

If you’re here already or have just arrived, the first step is to make sure that you have correctly registered for residency in Poland.

If you were legally resident in Poland before 1 January 2021, you should obtain a new residence document from your local Voivodeship Office. This document will evidence your rights under the Withdrawal Agreement.

You can find further information about this here.

There’s some good information about the new residency application forms including links to the forms that you need to complete here.

UK nationals not covered by the Withdrawal Agreement coming to Poland from 1 January 2021 will be covered by general rules concerning entry and stay of third country nationals – Read more.

If you need additional support to complete your residency application, read the guidance on the UK Nationals Support Fund.

Passports and travel

You should carry your residence document, as well as your valid passport when you travel. If you have applied but not yet received your document, carry your certificate of application.

If you have not yet applied for a residence document, you should carry evidence that you are resident in Poland. This could include a tenancy agreement or a utility bill in your name, dating from 2020.

You can find further information about required documents on the Polish Border Guards website (scroll to the bottom of the page for the English language version) – Go to page.

If you cannot show that you are resident in Poland, you may be asked additional questions at the border to enter the Schengen area, and your passport may be stamped on entry and exit. This will not affect your rights in Poland.

Driving in Poland

UK licences are only valid in Poland for the first 6 months of residence. After 6 months, you must exchange your driving licence for a Polish licence. You do not need to retake a driving or theory test to exchange your licence.

Healthcare

Poland has an insurance-based healthcare system. If you’re not insured, you may be charged for using state healthcare services.

You can read information about healthcare for UK nationals living in Poland here.

Working in Poland

If you were legally resident in Poland before 1 January 2021, you have the right to work, as long as you remain legally resident.

You can find further information here.

Warsaw Expat Pubs & Bars

Usually, one of the first things the newly arrived do is seek out the expat bars in Warsaw. It's a good way to make friends, learn the ropes from those who have lived and worked in the city for a while, enjoy some food from home and socialise.

The hospitality industry in Warsaw is very competitive. Rates are not cheap, especially around the city’s hotspots, so it’s not unusual to see bars open with a flourish of advertising activity one month – to then close down just a few months later.

If you talk to any of the British, Irish or American expats who have lived in Warsaw for a while, they will tell you outrageous yarns of legendary expat bars of the past such as Bar Below, Bradley’s Bar and Tortilla Factory. Those that are even older will reminisce about the hotel bars; which in fact were once the only safe place for expats to get a drink 30 years ago.

But, that’s all irrelevant, then was then and now is now!

Nowadays, there really isn’t very much on offer in regards to a true, traditional expat bar with the one exception of Legends Bar at Emilii Plater 25, just a short stumble from the Marriot Hotel.

If an expat bar is where expats go to drink on a regular basis, then Legends ticks the box. The owners are Beata who is Polish and Graham who is from Liverpool, he’s an Evertonian who likes his football – reason number two why it’s an expat bar – you can watch the footie there.

Reason number 3 would be that they serve British grub such as steak and kidney pie with mashed potatoes and onion gravy, they also do a full English breakfast, fish & chips and other pub favourites.

Legends is a favourite with expats and locals alike, it’s not very big and can get crowded if there’s a good match on the telly or on quiz night, which happens on a Friday once every month.

There’s usually at least one British draught beer on offer in addition to Guinness and local lagers. The only drinks they don’t serve are cocktails, if you want Sex on the Beach – there’s plenty of cocktail bars a short walk away.

We are happy to report that yesterday (15th May 2021) saw Legends re-open for outside dining and drinking complete with an updated menu.

If you're in Warsaw and fancy a pint and a bite to eat, then Legends is highly recommended.

Top 10 things to do in Wrocław

There’s a lot to see and do in the city. Here’s our list of the Top 10 things to do in Wrocław. Click on the links for further information or to book a tour & buy tickets.

1. Wrocław Dwarfs

They’re referred to in Poland as dwarfs but they’re actually bronze gnomes around 20-30cm tall, which have been appearing in the streets of Wrocław since 2005. Today, there are hundreds of them, almost an invasion and they’ve become a major tourist attraction. You can even get maps and mobile apps to help you find them.

2. Old Town Hall

The 13th century Gothic Old Town Hall stands at the centre of the city’s Market Square and is one of the main landmarks of the city. It’s currently used for civic and cultural events, which are held in its Great Hall and also houses the Museum of Bourgeois Art and a restaurant in the basement. The structure is a mix of architectural styles with both Gothic and Renaissance features. The astronomical clock is made of larch wood and was built in 1580.

3. National Museum

The National Museum is one of Poland’s main branches of the National Museum system. It holds one of the largest collections of contemporary art in the country. You’ll find exhibits of Medieval sculpture on the ground floor in addition to paintings from the region, silverware, ceramics and furnishings. Polish art, primarily 17th century paintings, can be found on the 2nd floor.

Further information.

4. Panorama of Racławice

The Racławice Panorama is a monumental (15m x 114m) cycloramic painting depicting the Battle of Racławice, during the Kościuszko Uprising and is Wrocław’s pride and joy. It is wrapped around the internal walls of a purpose-built rotunda. The painting took nine artists, nine months to complete and used 750kg of paint. Visits are by guided audio tours, departing every half hour.

Skip-the-Line Panorama Raclawicka, National Museum and Ostrow Tumski tour

5. Church of the Holy Name of Jesus

This Late Baroque-Rococo church is part of Wrocław University and is one of the most picturesque in the city, if not the country. We can thank the Jesuits for this piece of architectural beauty, they built it way back in the 1690s on the site of the former Piast castle. The interior of the church has been painted to imitate marble and contains frescoes & ornate fittings.

Further information.

6. Botanical Gardens

You’ll find the Botanical Gardens on Cathedral Island. The gardens were built between 1811 – 1816 and are part of the University of Wrocław. Within the gardens, there is a large selection of plants, sculptures, aquariums, a large pond, bridges, a shop, and a café. The gardens are open from early April until mid-November.

Further information.

7. Wrocław Zoo

The Zoo is located on Wróblewskiego Street and is the oldest zoo in the country, opened in 1865. In terms of the number of animal species, it is the third largest zoological garden in the world and the largest in Poland. It is home to about 10,500 animals representing about 1,132 species.

Wroclaw Zoo tickets with private transportation

Further information.

8. Hansel & Gretel

One of Wrocław’s favourite photo opportunities, are two charming, skinny tenements known locally as Jaś i Małgosia, better known to German and English speakers as Hansel and Gretel. You’ll find them on the north-western corner of the Market Square. The two fairy tale houses are linked by a baroque archway built in 1728.

9. Church of St Elizabeth

St. Elizabeth’s Church of the Catholic Third Order of Saint Francis is a 14th century Gothic church and one of the most iconic structures of the city’s Old Town panorama. It has a 90m high tower, a triple nave and is by medieval chapels. Inside, you’ll find a mid-15th-century sacramentary and carved medieval choir stalls.

10. Archaeological Museum

This museum is housed inside of the city’s former 15th century Arsenal alongside the Military Museum. Exhibits focus on the period from the Stone Age to the 19th century. You’ll find everyday objects from these times such as tools, ornaments and weapons.

Further information.

Tripadvisor

For further ideas about what to do and see in the city, Tripadvisor are an excellent resource of information – Click here.