Łódź Province (Lodzkie)

Łódź (pronounced woodge) province is located in central Poland and is named after its capital and largest city.

The area has seven landscape parks and a number of well-known tourist attractions including the Museum of Art in Łódź; which has one of the biggest modern art collections in Europe, Poland’s only thermal spa in Uniejów and Kamieńsk Hill on the slope of the Bełchatów mine; which is a popular skiing facility.

The spa at Uniejów is also a giant aquatic fun park with swimming pools, water slides and rapid rivers and is a fun day out for the family.

An unusual but very interesting attraction is the PGE Power Giants museum in Bełchatów, an interactive educational centre, which explains how electricity is produced.

Tomaszowska Okrąglica is a collection of three tourist attractions in one location, the Blue Springs Reserve, the River Pilica Open-Air Museum (Poland’s first museum devoted to a river) and the Nagórzyckie Caves Underground Tourist Route.

Other popular attractions include the Safari Zoo in Borysew and the narrow-gauge railway linking Rogów with Rawa Mazowiecka and Biała Rawska. The railway was built in 1915 during World War I and today its cars transport tourists along a 49 km route, one of the longest narrow-gauge lines in the country.

Within Łódź province, you will find interesting historical buildings such as the well-preserved 12th-century Romanesque collegiate church in Tum and the 14th-century Royal Castle at Łęczyca.

The Łowicz region is a centre for traditional Polish arts and crafts, and the town’s regional museum showcases folk costumes, paper cut outs, and embroidery.

The city of Łódź was once home to a massive textile industry prior to going into decline after the second World War and today, it is famous for its architecture, Jewish heritage, cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries and a vibrant, buzzing nightlife. It is also the focal point of Poland's growing film industry.