Tag: Wrocław

Tag: Wrocław

Centennial Hall In Wroclaw

Centennial Hall

Centennial Hall Wroclaw – updated 09 September 2022

Centennial Hall was erected in 1911-1913 by the architect Max Berg as a multi-purpose recreational building and is a landmark in the history of reinforced concrete architecture. It was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2006.

Centennial Hall

The building is frequently visited by tourists and the local populace. It lies close to other popular tourist attractions, such as the Wrocław Zoo, the Japanese Garden, and the Pergola with its Multimedia Fountain.

National Historic Monument

The building became one of Poland’s official national Historic Monuments (Pomnik historii), as designated on 20th April 2005, together with the Four Domes Pavilion, the Pergola, and the Iglica. Its listing is maintained by the National Heritage Board of Poland.

The building was designed to respond to emerging social needs and included an assembly hall, an auditorium for theatre performances, an exhibition space and a sports venue.

The hall was built as part of a Centennial Exhibition to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Leipzig, won by the anti-French coalition against Napoleon Bonaparte.

Concrete technology

Max Berg, who was the Wrocław city architect at the time, designed the massive Centennial Hall using new reinforced concrete technology. It was a pioneering work of modern engineering and architecture and became a key reference in the design of public spaces and in the further evolution of reinforced concrete technology.

The 23m dome was the largest ever reinforced concrete dome in the world at the time and was made from steel and glass. The hall had an inner diameter of 69m and a height of 42m and was the largest building of its kind at the time of construction. It can seat around 7,000 people.

The Centennial Hall (Hala Stulecia) is currently one of the most sought-after places to organise exhibitions, conferences, congresses, and cultural and sporting events within Poland and from overseas.

Wroclaw Tours

Centennial Hall

What to expect from this tour

During your 2-hour trip, discover the most beautiful aspects of Wroclaw in a pleasant and satisfying way. Jump on the Segway and don't miss anything from Wroclaw Old Town has to offer.

While telling you many carefully selected trivia and pieces of information in a compelling way, your guide will take you into picturesque places such as Slodowa Island (Malt Island) and Piaskowa Island (Sand Island). Discover also Ostrow Tumski and an Archcathedral that’s located there (interested visitors might even go inside), or Ksawery Boulevard. Your route goes through the Lovers' Bridge, an exceptionally romantic place, especially in the evening when it’s illuminated by the light of streetlamps.

Get to see the Racławice panorama, the partisan hill, and the National Forum of Music. At the end of your trip, visit the four denominations district and a Synagogue. And don't forget about the dozens of dwarfs that you’ll encounter on the way.

Tours & Attractions

Lower Silesia (Dolnoslaskie)

Lower Silesia

Lower Silesia – updated 22 September 2022

Lower Silesia was handed back to Poland from Germany at the end of WWII and is known for an abundance of historic architecture of various styles. During the Middle Ages, the region was part of Piast-ruled Poland and was one of the leading regions of the country with its capital Wrocław being one of the main cities of the Polish Kingdom.

Lower Silesia

Castles & Palaces

Within Lower Silesia, you will find many castles and palaces, well preserved or reconstructed old towns, numerous spa towns, and historic burial sites of Polish monarchs and consorts. The region is one of the most visited provinces in Poland.

There’s over 100 castles and palaces in the region including: Książ Castle, Czocha Castle, Grodziec Castle, Gola Dzierżoniowska Castle, Oleśnica Castle and Kamieniec Ząbkowicki Palace.

Książ Castle

Książ Castle is one of the most popular tourist attractions in the province due to its mysterious underground tunnels. During World War II, Ksiaz Castle was taken over by the occupying German forces and following Hitler’s direct orders, a system of tunnels was constructed underneath the castle and surrounding areas. In 2018, a 1.5km section of the tunnels was opened to the public as a tourist attraction and a 45-minute tour is available.

Ksiaz Castle

Tourist attractions

Other attractions in Lower Silesia include: Kłodzko Fortress, Fort Srebrna Góra, Wambierzyce, Legnickie Pole, Henryków, Lubiąż Abbey, Krzeszów Abbey, Oleśnica Mała, Vang Stave Church, Churches of Peace, Sokołowsko, Cave Bear, Museum of Gold Mining and Metallurgy in Złoty Stok, Coal Mine in Nowa Ruda, Museum of Industry and Railway in Jaworzyna Śląska, Skull Chapel in Czermna, Mount Ślęża, Table Mountains, Owl Mountains, Karkonosze, The Main Trail Sudetes, Barycz Valley Landscape Park and connected with the history of World War II – the tunnels of Project Riese, a German Gross-Rosen concentration camp, German War Cemetery and Park Peace in the Nadolice Wielkie.

Wrocław

The most widely visited city is Wrocław, a city with a unique architectural and cultural make-up, symbolised by its magnificent market square. The Festival of Good Beer is held here every year, on the second weekend of June.

Tours & Attractions